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Author Topic: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)  (Read 5289 times)

Offline rafale77

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Re: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)
« Reply #30 on: February 23, 2019, 01:10:29 pm »
The biggest challenge I have is that it is simply not reliable.  Devices stop working pretty much at random. >90% of the time the response 'oh we can fix that'
The fix is to exclude and re-include which is mad. And it fails to address the actual issue that things should just not stop working.

I'm happy to see what the next firmware is (beyond this point release) but it's going to have to make some pretty big promises if there's a significant cost to upgrade.

C

Most of it is due to either data corruption or due to the vera trying to be too smart for its own good, trying to interpret zwave messages to reassign variables or create new child devices without user approval. When you create a system for prosumers, you can't just go automate configuration without user inputs. If you target the consumer market then you want your system to be easy to configure and setup while being trouble free and fail proof. The vera is neither... And it really could be both with little extra effort.

openLuup (79 devices, 141 scenes, 19 apps) master to VeraPlus (142 zwave nodes, 8 Zigbee nodes, 221 devices,  20 scenes , 2 apps) +  Hubitat (15 Zigbee nodes) + Home-Assistant (API Integrations). Bridged to Siri and Alexa. Homewave. VeraPlus ExtRooted and mios server independent.

Offline rigpapa

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Re: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)
« Reply #31 on: February 23, 2019, 02:56:37 pm »
The biggest problem for Z-Wave (and Vera) is that Z-Wave is a licensed system built on hardware that has to be sourced from a single manufacturer (or their one other authorized/licensed supplier). So every Z-Wave device carries with it the pay-to-play model that Sigma Designs enforces in its closed market.

This is relevant as more and more manufacturers enter the IoT space, and increasingly make their products run on WiFi, supported by a cloud infrastructure, mobile applications, or local APIs, or any combination of those. WiFi is comparatively close to free in terms of implementation hardware cost. WiFi chips are made by multiple manufacturers competing in an open market. Wifi is all but uniquitous in both home and professional environments. On top of WiFi are well-established, reliable standards like IP, and a software environment literally bursting with tools, technologies, libraries, and available source code and examples.

The negative of this is that the barrier to entry into the IoT market over WiFi is low, as evidenced by the fact that us weekend warriors and hobbyists are able to create our own WiFi IoT devices on a budget comparable to the cost of a visit to Starbucks. But that low barrier to entry now means there are ton of manufacturers out there flooding the market with cheap WiFi plugs, bulbs and LED strips, most of which will not be around this time next year.

The problem for Vera is that there is much pressure to support both, with the latter (WiFi) being a particular business and engineering problem. Melih has said he wants to support ALL devices, his language suggesting they do it themselves, but it is inconceivable how Vera/eZLO might actually do this in the WiFi space, when each of the already hundreds (maybe thousands?) of manufacturers has its own peculiarities, APIs, etc. And it doesn't make good business sense at all, IMO, as most of these products or manufacturers will disappear so fast from the market that Vera will scarcely have their support released before they do--Vera's own engineering investment will never be recouped in actual revenue and they clog their product with support for devices that no longer exist. It's a fools errand, I think, for them to chase the market like that.

What Vera/eZLO needs to do is provide the tools and infrastructure necessary for those manufacturers to do it themselves and do it well, and this will then also be how both they and us, as customers, tell which products are in the market for the long haul and which are not: if the manufacturer invests their own time to engineer and release their plugin/driver for Vera, they're probably investing for more than just catching a lucky patch of transient Amazon resellers. I hope when Melih said he wants to support all devices, this is what he actually meant.

But going back to cost, if you look at the cost of a Z-Wave receptable or plug compared to a WiFi plug, the Z-Wave products are consistently at least double here in the US. The cost of the chip and the development tools is likely the reason, because no sane manufacturer would want to make a device that isn't competitive in the market. The case for Z-Wave, then, is made on its mesh network, but this isn't much of a case in my view. My WiFi coverage with just a single carefully-placed Uniquiti AP in my home far exceeds the consistent, useful range of my Z-Wave network.

As a further inducement for manufacturers to support WiFi instead of Z-Wave, it is now possible, and increasingly so every day, to control a wide range of devices with Google or Amazon voice-activation out of the box, again, over WiFi. No local controller/hub is needed--the Google/Amazon device, or more correctly, the cloud behind that device, is your controller/hub. This is where I think the "death of the hub" pundits are off base. They're only looking at voice-activation and control as it is today, and not really looking at the true automation aspects and possibilities, the very personal and individual logic implementation that makes things in your home work when you're not barking orders at the hockey puck on the counter. Hubs are not going away, they are just changing form. And as most of us with any experience in this space know, relying on cloud services is a dicey proposition, and I think ultimately, after the market gets a bit more education, cloud-based control will not be well-tolerated by the market. If there is any movement away from hubs in the home/workplace, it is only temporary, and will serve to consolidate that market as well (so the question then is, will Vera/eZLO survive that consolidation?).

But we can all see today that there are many more choices available in WiFi-based devices than there are in Z-Wave devices, and although patchy in some functional areas still (sensors?), it already addresses devices that Z-Wave thus far does not (where's your Z-Wave vacuum cleaner control?). This trend will continue for the foreseeable future, ultimately diminishing Z-Wave's role in the consumer market to zero except for a few select devices (switches and dimmers, maybe some sensors). Z-Wave, I predict, will find its major role as a supporting technology with the big automation manufacturers, with systems backed by (nearly exclusively) professional design, sales and installation (i.e. consumers locked out). This helps them evolve off their aging individual and proprietary protocols, and relieves of them of any remaining pressure to make their own devices. But with a small number of large customers then providing the bulk of its revenue, Sigma will face both reduction in volume and increasing price pressure, and thus falling revenue and valuation, until it is ultimately gobbled up by one those larger customers.

Long term, for Vera, Z-Wave needs to be just a connection. Everything to do with a Z-Wave centric view of the world needs to be boiled out of the product. Support for Z-Wave itself ultimately needs to be an option (with an appurtenant reduction in cost for those Veras that ship without it). The only built-in protocol Vera needs is WiFi, and if that's all it has, it can still own a huge share of the consumer market.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2019, 03:03:11 pm by rigpapa »
Author of Reactor, DelayLight, SiteSensor, Rachio, Deus Ex Machina II, Intesis WMP Gateway, Auto Virtual Thermostat and VirtualSensor plugins. Vera Plus w/100+ Z-wave devices. Vera3, Lite. Hassio, Slapdash.

Offline rafale77

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Re: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)
« Reply #32 on: February 23, 2019, 03:30:06 pm »
@rigpapa,

Everything you said has been true until just the past year or two. The Zwave product line has been sold to Silicon Labs (no longer Sigma Design) and though the radio is still single sourced, it is much cheaper now as it seems the patents expired. Actually Silicon Labs provides all the dev tools for free: https://www.silabs.com/support/z-wave. OpenZwave for example is no longer a reverse engineering project. It now has access to the full stack.
This is how I was able to extract newer firmwares from their SDK. I have been able to buy zwave devices for about $10 so I would not burry zwave quite yet. Its real limitation in my opinion is bandwidth. It is no longer cost of device/development or availability.
Your point about the move to wifi has been triggered by the release of very cheap chinese designed 2.4GHz wifi radios:  the ESP8266 https://www.espressif.com which was a breakthrough and has since created a market for wifi based IOT devices. Before that wifi was too expensive and not power efficient and I still don't see battery operating devices running on wifi. I don't think this will happen until the power efficiency takes another leap. There are other challenges to wifi which is inherently not designed to act as a mesh or to scale from a data efficiency standpoint forcing multiplication of APs. Most consumer APs for example have a client limitation of 50-100 devices. You also have the limitation of 255 IP per subnet etc... This is why google and others are investing in Thread which is another protocol again operating in the 2.4GHz band and is really a Zigbee alternative. I don't believe wifi devices for home automation is the future.
I am personally not in favor of further expansion on the 2.4GHz band, between BT, Microwave, Zigbee, wifi, wireless phones (yeah I still have that), it is interference galore and in spite of the greater bandwidth is also inherently less range/power efficient than Zwave or even 433MHz. At this point in time, Zwave remains the most comprehensive ecosystem closely followed by Zigbee, each having their pros and cons but wifi will remain in a niche, albeit growing, for high value/high complexity, AC powered devices.

https://news.silabs.com/2018-04-18-Silicon-Labs-Completes-Acquisition-of-Sigma-Designs-Z-Wave-Business
« Last Edit: February 24, 2019, 03:13:33 am by rafale77 »
openLuup (79 devices, 141 scenes, 19 apps) master to VeraPlus (142 zwave nodes, 8 Zigbee nodes, 221 devices,  20 scenes , 2 apps) +  Hubitat (15 Zigbee nodes) + Home-Assistant (API Integrations). Bridged to Siri and Alexa. Homewave. VeraPlus ExtRooted and mios server independent.

Offline rigpapa

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Re: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)
« Reply #33 on: February 23, 2019, 08:24:58 pm »
You also have the limitation of 255 IP per subnet etc.

There's no inherent limitation that a subnet supports only 255 nodes. This is only true because that's the most common network length shipped in device by default, and most people will simply never change the default network their router shipped with. But if you use 192.168.x./23 (netmask 255.255.254.0) you get 512 nodes (nominally); or with /22 (netmask 255.255.252.0) you can have 1024 nodes (nominally) in the subnet. In fact, 192.168/16 can be configured as a single subnet of up to 64K nodes, and there are the larger 172.16/12 and 10/8 spaces that can be used as well. Now, the desirability and maintainability of a single subnetwork that size is surely questionable, but that would not be different from any kind of network, including Z-Wave.

The big problem for consumer APs topping out at 50-100 nodes is actually the weight of the encryption on the processor. This is never more clear than when you start using IP cameras. Or just have teenaged kids. But I've had APs in larger facilities handle 300+ nodes without missing a bit, and I don't think that's even a stretch for them. They're not consumer equipment, but they're not out of reach, either. Consumer gear is built for a couple of phones, tablets and laptops, not 200 devices, and not 20 cameras each streaming at 2Mbps or more. Just because it supports a WiFi protocol capable of 150Mbps, or 300, or now into Gbps, doesn't mean you're going to get that through the device. You don't often find an ASIC handling encryption in those consumer devices, it's the same processor that handles the web configuration UI, routing, packet filters, DNS, DHCP, and every other feature they put in it, and all at the same time. We should not be surprised when the wireless network performance is lagging when the router/AP combo is actually exactly the same class of device as... your Vera.

Good info on Z-Wave. I haven't kept up as much as on the details as I should have, perhaps, but I doubt those transitions make much difference, especially with a single-supplier (or two supplier) radio/chip at the core ongoing. They certainly wouldn't affect my predicted outcome. In a world where things are engineered to the penny or fraction, the cost will remain a driver for some time even if others come in on the (radio) manufacturing side, and WiFi is still way ahead of it in terms of adoption and market penetration. On the consumer side, it's harder for users to diagnose troubles in a mesh (as evidenced by the current Z-Wave experience, not just on Vera) than it is for people to just grab another AP or RE and "fix" the poor signal at the device they want working. And really, it's just one more thing the consumer needs to learn, and that creates a lot of resistance. Just as Beta was arguably better than VHS, better technology is not what wins the war.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2019, 10:54:45 pm by rigpapa »
Author of Reactor, DelayLight, SiteSensor, Rachio, Deus Ex Machina II, Intesis WMP Gateway, Auto Virtual Thermostat and VirtualSensor plugins. Vera Plus w/100+ Z-wave devices. Vera3, Lite. Hassio, Slapdash.

Offline HSD99

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Re: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)
« Reply #34 on: February 23, 2019, 10:44:14 pm »
Silicon Labs is supporting Z-Wave, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth,Thread, Xpress and Zigbee---they're hedging their bets and plan to support everything. The new Series 700 Z-Wave chipset (https://www.silabs.com/products/wireless/mesh-networking/z-wave/700-platform) is a significant upgrade with Silicon labs taking over all the software---developers will only write application code. But that's years away.

Cheap Wi-Fi will be in products that support Alexa and Google, and that's a huge market. Look at how many Wi-Fi in-wall dimmer switches are on Amazon already, and what they cost. I have some nice RGB Wi-Fi lamps from a reputable manufacturer that work great with Vera (Thanks @rigpapa!) and cost HALF of the Z-Wave equivalent.  Like @rigpapa, my Wi-Fi network's range, speed and stability is much better than the Z-wave network. You can check a Wi-Fi network by walking around with your phone. Z-wave? Not so much. Consumer Wi-Fi performance continues to increase, and prosumer devices like Ubiquiti offer enterprise performance at home network prices.

I can move these lamps around the house without a problem, unlike the Z-Wave mesh, which will go down the tubes if you move a powered node until the mesh is rebuilt. Did I mention that the Wi-Fi data rate is in the 10s of MB/s---the native smartphone app has a color wheel that you can use in real time! That said, Wi-Fi HA devices will consume negligible bandwidth on a home network in almost all cases.

As @rafale77 points out, current Wi-Fi solutions don't do much for battery operated sensors. IEEE 802.3ah (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11ah Wi-Fi HaLow --- pronounced HAY-Low) is a ~900 Mhz Wi-Fi standard with a kilometer range and low power, specifically designed to compete with Z-Wave and Zigbee, for IoT and HA, but at much-higher data rates. It also supports a relay mode (mesh-ish). Uptake of 802.11ah has been very low, however, and the chipsets come from small fabless semiconductor houses.

So Z-wave may hang on to the battery sensor market segment. I think that Zigbee is the one that will go away. It already dukes it out with Wi-fi in the overcrowded 2.4 Ghz band, and if Wi-Fi takes over AC powered nodes (likely) with Z-Wave (likely) or HaLow (doubtful, but who knows)  for battery devices, who needs Zigbee?

One of the great benefits of this forum is the chance to have really interesting discussions---thanks @rigpapa and @rafele77!

Offline rafale77

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Re: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)
« Reply #35 on: February 24, 2019, 03:42:00 am »
To further the discussion on why I do not believe wifi is the future of home automation at large and can only be used in a small amount of device powered device, it is that wifi by design is a "hub and spoke" architecture. The reason why you can move device around is because all the devices communicate with the same hub directly. By design and it is simple physics, the signal range in order to do this, all the devices need to emit very powerful RF which requires a lot of power. I actually have a RF spectrometer in my home and I was stunned by the amount of power generated by wifi Vs BT or Zigbee in the 2.4GHz band. It is no wonder its range is so much greater and why it consumes so much more power (a couple of orders of magnitude). A lot more power than a mesh design in which each device can talk to the hub through a relay. This is not confuse with the "wifi mesh" which has been in vogue and is a mesh of AP/hubs and not of devices. It may conceptually actually may work for home automation because it reduces the range required by the devices and the bandwidth which dramatically reduces the more relay it needs to transmit through should actually still be plenty but... this is more the BLE design. Wifi is designed for bandwidth (and range) and has different requirements than what is needed for HA.

The issue with having only battery zwave devices is also... that you actually do not get a mesh that way so we do need the AC powered devices to constitute the mesh, at which point, it doesn't make a lot of sense to have two RF protocols for devices in the house. Yes Zwave and its mesh has its compromises but most devices are physically static and rarely need to be moved. And yes its implementation still has a lot of room for improvement but I do not see wifi as a viable direction for home automation devices. It is extremely inefficient to the point of not being able of being battery powered which limits its application, has a bandwidth which is overkill and therefore will only be used for devices requiring high bandwidth. Take for example the ecobee thermostat which is wifi but for which the remote sensors runs on 433MHz. I have been looking for blind pulling automation and the project I funded on indiegogo is still struggling with power consumption with zwave... I tried implementing also a wifi relay using a ESP and using 4 D batteries the idle life of the 24AH was less than a week while my keen vent on zigbee with 4AA~=8AH have lasted now over 2 years. It's not even close.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2019, 03:43:59 am by rafale77 »
openLuup (79 devices, 141 scenes, 19 apps) master to VeraPlus (142 zwave nodes, 8 Zigbee nodes, 221 devices,  20 scenes , 2 apps) +  Hubitat (15 Zigbee nodes) + Home-Assistant (API Integrations). Bridged to Siri and Alexa. Homewave. VeraPlus ExtRooted and mios server independent.

Offline jaccord

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Re: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)
« Reply #36 on: February 24, 2019, 08:23:28 am »
OP - There are lot of thoughtful replies in this thread, but I'll add my $0.02 anyway.

The Zwave protocol and devices isn't your problem, unless you have specific coverage problems or a bad device or two.  It's generally solid and reliable when used with a strong controller.

WiFi devices are slightly less so, but not by much.  They exist for primarily commercial reasons - grandma can get a bulb she can have Alexa turn on without being a HA hobbyist.  Except for specific use cases (lights without neutral wires, or very natural temperature bulbs like TP Link's Kasa) you'd be better off sticking to Zwave.

As for Vera, if you're no longer satisfied with the reliability of the platform you should switch.  I use Homeseer now after almost a decade on Vera.  It is a completely different experience.  Reliable and extensible - I use python scripts to control some wifi bulbs as if they were directly connected to Homeseer.  All done locally - no internet required.  Events (scenes in Vera) always fire - always.  Timed events always occur on time.  It recovers from power failure events gracefully, and will evaluate and fire events which should have occurred during the outage, if you choose.

It is a completely different experience - once it was configured and the automation set up, you forget about it.  The only reason to look at it is if you're a tinkerer, and want to see what else can be done.

I'm sure other platforms with which I've no experience (home assistant comes to mind) are also good, but HomeSeer is 20 years old now - it's got a significant head start, and the reliable core of the platform shows it.

In summary - if you only want to tell Alexa to turn on your lights, you can probably stick with Vera.  If you want a reliable platform for actual automation, you should consider moving to something like HomeSeer.


Offline opel-oleg

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Re: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)
« Reply #37 on: February 24, 2019, 01:49:49 pm »
Since the advent of the plug-ins that the respected rigpapa has created, I have no thoughts of leaving Vera
This controller mostly suits me

Offline rigpapa

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Re: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)
« Reply #38 on: February 24, 2019, 04:43:31 pm »
Since the advent of the plug-ins that the respected rigpapa has created, I have no thoughts of leaving Vera
This controller mostly suits me

I only stand on the shoulders of giants. But thank you for this, as it affirms that my work thus far is hitting the mark I was aiming for. Can't ask for more than that, and I appreciate not just the support I get from this community, but the fellowship and intellectual stimulation that it brings as well.
Author of Reactor, DelayLight, SiteSensor, Rachio, Deus Ex Machina II, Intesis WMP Gateway, Auto Virtual Thermostat and VirtualSensor plugins. Vera Plus w/100+ Z-wave devices. Vera3, Lite. Hassio, Slapdash.

Offline zedrally

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Re: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)
« Reply #39 on: February 24, 2019, 05:19:32 pm »
My 2 cents worth.
Z-wave started this by allocating different frequencies/regions world wide and then insisting that all devices HAD to be independantly certified for use. On top of Test Reports (cost) for RF and Electrical Safety one then had to present the device to a Certifying body (more cost) before taking the device to market.
i won't mention that you also had to pay up to $5K PA for the privilage, everyone has there hand out to take money from you, little wonder most manufacturers choose to put an inexpensive WiFi chip into their AC's, Heaters, Garage Door controllers etc.

The costs everything associated with Z-Wave is/was triple what it should be. I think this is now back firing.

This may change now with the sale of Sigma to a company that is equally focused on manufacture of WiFi-Z-Wave & BLE.
The ideal would 1 chip that combines all frequencies & protocols, but that is probably to much to wish for.
The consumer has spoken and WiFi will become the choice of the mutitude, Z-Wave will be consigned to the experimenters market, woukdn't worry about BLE/Zigbee becoming anything.
As mentioned by a previous poster, Grandma will happily by a WiFi bulb that she can directly control by Alexa.
Having said all of this, I'm looking at WiFi being a stepping stone for those that want "more" and that should be Z-Wave.
Living in the Land of Oz, give me a vegemite sandwich. Home Seer, Vera Lite & Edge, Popp, Black Cat Smart Hub & Vera G, Black Cat Lite 1 & 2's a Black Cat Dimmer or 2, Fantem Tec and then some  Black Cat Cat's Eye PIR's & Door-Window Sensors, RFXComm, Broadlink RMPro & Mini plus a Z-UNO or 2.

Offline HSD99

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Re: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)
« Reply #40 on: February 24, 2019, 05:27:05 pm »
Since the advent of the plug-ins that the respected rigpapa has created, I have no thoughts of leaving Vera
This controller mostly suits me
I agree 100%!!

Offline rafale77

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Re: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)
« Reply #41 on: February 24, 2019, 05:42:51 pm »
Since the advent of the plug-ins that the respected rigpapa has created, I have no thoughts of leaving Vera
This controller mostly suits me
I agree 100%!!

No argument there either... I am making good use of Site Sensor.  ;D ;D
openLuup (79 devices, 141 scenes, 19 apps) master to VeraPlus (142 zwave nodes, 8 Zigbee nodes, 221 devices,  20 scenes , 2 apps) +  Hubitat (15 Zigbee nodes) + Home-Assistant (API Integrations). Bridged to Siri and Alexa. Homewave. VeraPlus ExtRooted and mios server independent.

Offline martynwendon

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Re: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)
« Reply #42 on: February 24, 2019, 05:47:53 pm »
woukdn't worry about BLE/Zigbee becoming anything.

I think Philips (Hue) would disagree :-)  And the likes of Osram, Innr and SmartThings too.  Xiaomi Aqara are another one to watch as well - the previous and current ranges aren't quite ZigBee compliant (but are close enough to work) but the future versions are supposedly ZigBee 3.0 compliant.  Ikea have also recently launched their own Smart Home range which is ZigBee based and good value (and is rumoured to be built by Xiaomi).

And Amazon seem to be backing ZigBee in a pretty big way, it wouldn't surprise me if they eventually put a ZigBee chip in the entire Echo range, not just the higher end models.  Amazon don't often make mistakes, you can bet they looked at what the most sold Smart Home devices on their site were and went with a ZigBee radio to instantly become compatible with those devices (if not immediately then certainly eventually).  I can't believe they'd bet on something they didn't think was going to be a winner.

I wonder in terms of quantity, how many ZigBee devices are sold worldwide compared to Z-Wave ..... sure people like us probably have 100's of Z-Wave but I would guess that we're the minority.  Whereas I can count a dozen people I know (friends and family) that have Hue or Ikea lighting .... OK maybe only a handful or so devices each but the point is that ZigBee may become the technology of choice purely by the fact that it's already in mainstream devices.

Offline zedrally

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Re: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)
« Reply #43 on: February 24, 2019, 08:39:29 pm »
^^^
I wonder how many of those people actually know they have brought ZigBee?
Few would be my guess, but they all know it's WiFi, they just don't know the protocol and would care either as it's all Plug & Play.


Depending on marketing WiFi is strongly used as the sales lead. Nearly everyone identifies WiFi, outside of the tech world who identifies Z-Wave (or ZigBee)?

Living in the Land of Oz, give me a vegemite sandwich. Home Seer, Vera Lite & Edge, Popp, Black Cat Smart Hub & Vera G, Black Cat Lite 1 & 2's a Black Cat Dimmer or 2, Fantem Tec and then some  Black Cat Cat's Eye PIR's & Door-Window Sensors, RFXComm, Broadlink RMPro & Mini plus a Z-UNO or 2.

Offline rafale77

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Re: Anyone else giving up on Z-wave? (or Vera)
« Reply #44 on: February 24, 2019, 11:35:16 pm »
Indeed, I get the feeling that at least mid term Zigbee is here to stay. It has been used in customized stacks by several big companies and as the HA1.2 stack was released, has picked up a lot of momentum. The advantage of the HA stack is to have a common protocol and assigned endpoints for all vendors to use so the devices can all work on the same network, very similar to the zwave stack. What is interesting is that Silicon Labs also acquired Ember which owns EZSP. The EmberZNet Serial Protocol making controllers basically talk through a serial API... just like zwave.  This is what the vera uses as well for zigbee. Unlike Zwave though, Silicon Labs requires users to have purchased a dev kit to get access to their SDK. Zigbee is achieving very low power consumption through using very narrow channel width and pulsing... it is not transmitting all the time unlike wifi. What I dislike though is that it is on 2.4GHz and so very prone to interference: I was able to kill my philips hue communication with my Sonos (wifi) and with my microwave. Of course I changed channel but the choices  available with the RF emitted by neighbors is just not very large.
openLuup (79 devices, 141 scenes, 19 apps) master to VeraPlus (142 zwave nodes, 8 Zigbee nodes, 221 devices,  20 scenes , 2 apps) +  Hubitat (15 Zigbee nodes) + Home-Assistant (API Integrations). Bridged to Siri and Alexa. Homewave. VeraPlus ExtRooted and mios server independent.