Author Topic: Planning a new pool pump install and how to automate control  (Read 14655 times)

Offline thewizardofoz

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 123
  • Karma: +4/-2
  • Vera 3
Re: Planning a new pool pump install and how to automate control
« Reply #15 on: June 30, 2014, 07:12:44 pm »
I have a VS pump now (Hayward) and my salt generator / controller will automatically kick the pump up to the high speed setting I have entered for using the heater.  Maybe your system has that ability?
Vera 3 UI5  with 2 slave Vera 3s and 1 slave VeraLite all connected by CAT6.  Running about 130 devices and 8 Plug-ins including PLEG

Offline tdinardo

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 150
  • Karma: +1/-1
Re: Planning a new pool pump install and how to automate control
« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2014, 11:11:33 am »
For what it's worth, I waited about three years to replace my pool equipment hoping for a solid z-wave integration to come on the market. I figure I'll put a few thoughts in here to help others who might be on the fence about some of this stuff. I finally gave up on native z-wave support and settled for a Jandy iAqualink system. Shortly after I got everything installed I stumbled on the Autelis thread and bought one of those.

The pool: 20K gallons, spa with waterfall spillover, Jandy heater (unknown model), and two single speed pumps. Horribly loud and very expensive to run.

The replacement equipment: After a good bit of research, I decided to go with a single Jandy 2.0 ePump, LXi400PN heater, and IQ904PS iAqualink Controller.

The way I use the pool I never need to run the pool and spa at the same time, so I re-engineered the plumbing to allow the deletion of one pump.

I found that the iAqualink system, when connected over Wifi, is unreliable. It will drop off the network for no reason. The only way to get it back is to power cycle the system. When it works, it works great for remote control via your phone or PC. However, the scheduling configuration is completely worthless. It just does not work reliably. Having complex rules is a complete non-starter.

Enter the Autelis controller. Bought directly from Autelis and delivered in a couple days. Nice professional piece of kit. Basic installation is really straight forward. Add it to the Jandy system like any other controller with a simple piece of 4-wire. If you don't have cat-6 to your control panel (I don't), you can work around this with a Zyxel power line Ethernet adapter. I have a few in my place to areas without Cat-6. They have been very reliable.

Integration with Vera. Not easy. If MDA hadn't written and published his integration, I'd never have gotten this working. That said, MDA's integration works perfectly. Now full scheduling control and a redundant path to the system is possible.

Variable speed versus Single/Two Speed.... All I can say is if you like silence, variable speed is your only option. At 600RPM you have to be standing at the pump inspecting the basket to know if it's running. It's that quiet. Money savings? I don't have enough electric bills in hand for complete monthly usage yet (I've only had the system in place for about a month), but the controller says it's only using 16 watts when running at 600RPM. I suspect my bill is going to be noticeably lower. I run at 1200RPM for two hours in the morning and 600RPM for the remainder of the day (total run time of 12 hours).

Heater replacement.... The old heater was loud, slow and expensive to run. The new heater is substantially quieter. It can heat the pool from 80 to 90 in less than 2 hours. Based on propane usage since the install, I'd say it's well over 2x more efficient.

One additional upgrade I'm going to do is add a Intermatic CA3750 at my panel so I can remotely reboot the entire Jandy panel if needed. This may be overkill, but since there's no way to do it natively, and the CA3750 is so cheap, I think I'm going to do it.

If you're on the fence on what to buy, I can tell you that you won't regret going with any of the above equipment. I am very happy I made the jump.

Offline donkeykong

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 13
  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Planning a new pool pump install and how to automate control
« Reply #17 on: July 22, 2014, 04:15:20 am »
Thanks for the detailed reply. Can you comment a bit more about the cost of your components and setup, as well as the bit about rerouting your plumbing to only need one pump?

I purchased the CA3750 to install on my old, single speed pump, but it looks like it just crapped out. Hopefully the home warranty takes care of a replacement but I don't think I'll have much choice in model. And I think in AZ they force you to upgrade to VS, so native zwave may be out. But if I'm not paying for the pump/motor then maybe the cost of a multiwave wouldn't be so bad?
« Last Edit: July 22, 2014, 04:18:14 am by donkeykong »

Offline tdinardo

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 150
  • Karma: +1/-1
Re: Planning a new pool pump install and how to automate control
« Reply #18 on: July 23, 2014, 10:35:26 am »
I ordered most of the stuff through Amazon and had a local electrician and plumber assist with the install. Cost for all parts was a bit less than $5K (this included a about $450 of Versa-plumb stuff that helped reduce the install time). Labor was about $5K included excavating the area where the plumbing came into the equipment pad and redoing all the plumbing in that area. Cost without having to do that would have been about $2.5K. To delete the spa pump all that was required was configuring the plumbing to switch paths with actuators when the system is set to spa mode. Not very hard and definitely worth doing if you don't need to run both spa and pool at the same time.

Offline donkeykong

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 13
  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Planning a new pool pump install and how to automate control
« Reply #19 on: July 25, 2014, 02:54:45 am »
Wow that is definitely not cheap. Do you need to have an Aqualink installed before you can use Autelis? seems that would be the way to go, or a multiwave.

Offline tdinardo

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 150
  • Karma: +1/-1
Re: Planning a new pool pump install and how to automate control
« Reply #20 on: July 25, 2014, 08:07:54 am »
True, not cheap, but considering the quotes I got for the same setup from two pool compaies were well more than double, I'm happy. Also, keep in mind that the heater by itself is $2k, and this was a complete rip and replace job. All existing equipment was replaced. If all you are doing is a pump replacement,  you can do it yourself for a couple grand including the aqua link stuff.

Offline integlikewhoa

  • Master Member
  • *******
  • Posts: 5585
  • Karma: +152/-368
Re: Planning a new pool pump install and how to automate control
« Reply #21 on: August 04, 2014, 05:24:45 pm »
I found that the iAqualink system, when connected over Wifi, is unreliable. It will drop off the network for no reason. The only way to get it back is to power cycle the system. When it works, it works great for remote control via your phone or PC. However, the scheduling configuration is completely worthless. It just does not work reliably. Having complex rules is a complete non-starter.

I had this same problem for months after install. I was ready to install a wire but didn't have the time. I ended up playing with my routers type of security encryption and no more problems. I found this solution on a pool forum with others complaing of the same problem.  I always had good signal.

New antenna just came out few months ago (Iaqualink 2.0) that from what I heard fixes this problem. But if you have the old one like me change encryption settings and you should get it working to 100%. Its in the TKIP and AES settings if I remember right. I think I had both but switched to only one. I use WPA2.

Offline scravott

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 86
  • Karma: +0/-1
Re: Planning a new pool pump install and how to automate control
« Reply #22 on: September 08, 2014, 03:52:00 pm »
For what its worth I am using a hayward ecostar in relay control mode and using 2 insteon i/o lincs along with the relay in my hayward solar controller to control the pump speed.  In addition I am using intermatic actuators connected to an insteon EZ-Flora to control 4 water features in the pool.  I use Vera 3 with Altsteon to accomplish this.  I also use an Intermatic CA3750 for controlling the main power to the pump and my pool light.  This is more of a do it yourself approach but it works. I use PLEG to automate the pool with scenes and to provided some visual feedback.  Attached is a screenshot of the pool controls.

Offline Kmitchel

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 166
  • Karma: +1/-2
Re: Planning a new pool pump install and how to automate control
« Reply #23 on: April 08, 2015, 03:13:13 pm »
I just installed my AquaLink 2.0.  I've not had any issues so far.  I'd like to be able to connect it to my Vera, but that isn't a deal breaker for me.  I hope that one day it will have Vera integration and Vera will get Amazon Echo integration.  Then I can say "turn on the hot tub and notify me when ready" and have Alexa say "the hot tub is warm".  Now that would be cool!

Offline integlikewhoa

  • Master Member
  • *******
  • Posts: 5585
  • Karma: +152/-368
Re: Planning a new pool pump install and how to automate control
« Reply #24 on: April 08, 2015, 04:27:11 pm »
I just installed my AquaLink 2.0.  I've not had any issues so far.  I'd like to be able to connect it to my Vera, but that isn't a deal breaker for me.  I hope that one day it will have Vera integration and Vera will get Amazon Echo integration.  Then I can say "turn on the hot tub and notify me when ready" and have Alexa say "the hot tub is warm".  Now that would be cool!

Yea I'm with you on the iAquaLink and VERA, but so far the only working solution is http://www.autelis.com/ and its 269.99. I haven't wanted to add that after spending the $ on upgrading to iAqualink.

I theory Vera could have a plugin that sends http commands directly to the iAqualink as it supports that. But without an API no one knows or has put the effort to figure it out.

The autelis will plug into your existing iAqualink just like an extra remote and can run on the side of your existing setup. So It works, if you pay the 270.00 for vera control.