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General => Temperature Monitoring & HVAC Control => Topic started by: jimpapa on March 11, 2014, 08:43:18 am

Title: Zwave air vent
Post by: jimpapa on March 11, 2014, 08:43:18 am
I never knew this existed... A zwave controlled air vent

http://www.smarthome.com/_/EcoNet/_/48D/nav.aspx?src=HML14RA49

Has anyone used one with vera ?

Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: waynehead99 on March 11, 2014, 09:01:55 am
That does look pretty cool. My only concern being that shutting down too many vents might cause issues with the heater getting too much back pressure. Maybe I am over thinking it though. I do have some possible uses for this and curious as well about feedback.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: SirMeili on March 11, 2014, 12:40:27 pm
They are a tad expensive, and I do wish they had some other sizes, but these could work. I'm trying to think of use cases for these. I guess I could close off rooms that I don't want cooled/heated or adjust rooms on the fly. I've noticed that in general though, once I have them set where I like them, they rarely need adjusting.

Still, I like to see people using z-wave in interesting new ways. I might have to get one just to mess with. :)

Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: johnlaroux on March 11, 2014, 02:58:34 pm
To bad you can't modulate them in 10% increments.  Just open and closed  is not that great.  You would need to install a barometric bypass damper on your AC unit to maintain a constant flow across your cooling coil. 
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: SirMeili on March 11, 2014, 03:15:59 pm
To bad you can't modulate them in 10% increments.  Just open and closed  is not that great.  You would need to install a barometric bypass damper on your AC unit to maintain a constant flow across your cooling coil.

I didn't even notice that! I would prefer more adjustments as well because you could potentially adjust the airflow from your system to compensate for things such as sun position (in the morning the E side of my house is warmer than the W and in the evening it is reversed).
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: AgileHumor on March 11, 2014, 05:33:48 pm
@johnlaroux: What is a "barometric bypass damper on your AC unit"? Is that to ensure enough air goes over the coil or it will break something.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: phiednate on March 11, 2014, 10:14:07 pm
I  saw those about a month ago and the first thing that came to mind is some sort of automated closing and opening of the vent based on the temperature in the room. You could set up temp sensors in each room that automatically closed when that room reached a certain temp. Would reduce hot spots and heat your house faster. Would require temp sensors in each room though and is way beyond any programming skills I might have.

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: johnlaroux on March 11, 2014, 10:47:05 pm
@johnlaroux: What is a "barometric bypass damper on your AC unit"? Is that to ensure enough air goes over the coil or it will break something.

Well a barometric damper looks like this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Durozone-8-10-or-12-inch-round-bypass-barometric-pressure-relief-damper-/121241908775

You run a duct from discharge duct to return air duct  with the barometric bypass damper in-between.    It has and adjustable weight on it to set when it opens.
If the pressure in the supply duct becomes to high because to many vents are closed in the house, the barometric bypass damper will open and relieve the pressure into the return duct.
This will help maintain the proper flow over the cooliing coil.

Im not an expert on any of this.  I just have heard that its recommended to have one if you close down on to many vents, or have some automatic zone control.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: AgileHumor on March 11, 2014, 10:51:34 pm
Thank you sir, you are a scholar and a gentleman.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: AgileHumor on March 14, 2014, 05:51:02 pm
To bad you can't modulate them in 10% increments. 

So I bought and installed one of these today.  It is a dimmable light, and while it closes completely then opens to (per the manual to calibrate) on each change, 10% increments are possible.

Cool stuff. But command and control needs to be thought out before I can install more.

Sadly, they also don't have my size (6 x 10 or 4 x 8) for more then half my registers.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: SirMeili on March 14, 2014, 06:33:20 pm
To bad you can't modulate them in 10% increments. 

So I bought and installed one of these today.  It is a dimmable light, and while it closes completely then opens to (per the manual to calibrate) on each change, 10% increments are possible.

Cool stuff. But command and control needs to be thought out before I can install more.

Sadly, they also don't have my side (6 x 10 or 4 x 8) for more then half my registers.

Ok...so while you have it ;) CAn you see if you can do other than 10% increments? that is a limitation of the Vera UI. For instance, if it shows up in one of the remote Apps, you should be able to set it to any %. I'm just curious of you watch it if it still adheres to the 10% (basically 6% would still move 10%) or if it will actually move to any % of open.

Thanks for being a guinea pig :)

Oh, and I agree about the sizes. I have some square ones around the house that I would want to replace with these I couldn't. I"m guessing they limit the size because they need room for the control box, which also cuts off part of the air flow. If you tried to do a 4x8 with one of these, you might only end up with 4"x4" of actual vent.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: AgileHumor on March 14, 2014, 11:34:51 pm
Quote
k...so while you have it ;) CAn you see if you can do other than 10% increments?

It works when I create a scene for 5%...but it doesn't seem different from 10%.  That's because it always has to open/close when changing positions to calibrate.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: rlmalisz on March 16, 2014, 02:45:36 pm
Quote
k...so while you have it ;) CAn you see if you can do other than 10% increments?

It works when I create a scene for 5%...but it doesn't seem different from 10%.  That's because it always has to open/close when changing positions to calibrate.

Quick additional question: what, if any, noise occurs during operation--that is, when the device is changing % open?  I would expect there to be nothing beyond a bit of hum, but it's worth asking.

--Richard

PS: cats are going to be fascinated with these things.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: AgileHumor on March 16, 2014, 03:37:29 pm
I uploaded a video.  But surprisingly, not that loud. 

Sadly, not great lighting.

http://1drv.ms/1hpw6vK

Had a open/close/dim command fire every five seconds.  Open, Close, Open, 50%, 5%.  Extra movements is for it's calibration close.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: Pseudomizer on March 16, 2014, 04:12:47 pm
Wow. Thanks for the video. This is cool stuff. I can see myself already coming up with a variety of scenes but I like the idea the most where I can control certain rooms based on sensors. Now I have to do a lot of planning first before I start buying that stuff.

My only concern is that I would completely mess up the Nest autoprogramming which is supposed to save me money in the first place. I have one Nest and it is in the hallway and it measures the temperature just in that room so my office which is on the other side of the house could get really warm. With this I could close all vents and just push cold air into the office room until it is cooled down and I could even automate this with a sensor but what will Nest do with all the statistics as Nest will have no clue why I manually ran for x minutes the air condition when the room already had the temperature it should have based on the Nest thermostat value?

This is a big concern of mine because now a smart thermostat would become not so smart and actually might be more confused than helpful.

What are your thoughts around this guys?
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: AgileHumor on March 16, 2014, 04:25:44 pm
I have motion HSM motion sensors in each room that also give temp.  Once I calibrate their temp down a bit (since they are up high), I was going to just "bypass" (close vent) the current room if it is => the current HVAC set point. 

This could leave the logic simple, and in theory should not confuse the nest whom's programming is simply "heat until i reach set point" (unless away).

There is a special feature where it learns how long to pre-heat before the specified scheduled temp change, and it learns how long it takes to heat from say 67 to 71 degrees in the morning and will learn how long ti takes to heat cool.   That is turned off by default, but could be affected.

My main problem is my thermostat is down stairs, and not near a vent, so it takes a long time to warm that area.   I'm worries what happens when 50% of vents are bypassed that it won't get warmed at all.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: Pseudomizer on March 16, 2014, 04:42:27 pm
Hmmm. So what we all really need is the following:

Z-wave controlled vents in every room, temperature sensors in every room and a specialized smart thermostat which is aware of all the rooms and has a built-in logic on how to most efficiently cool down those rooms and ideally based on occupancy and maybe predict the occupancy to save energy.

Sounds like a huge project and whoever comes up with an automated solution could be a hero.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: AgileHumor on March 16, 2014, 05:16:49 pm
Do you speak French? :)
https://apps.mios.com/plugin.php?id=2968

I think this developer has 90% of the system already built.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: AgileHumor on March 17, 2014, 10:43:15 am
So I contacted the company this weekend as I did find 10" x 6" on their website.  They agreed to sell me the 10" model which is not in retail.

They are working on a Outside Gate Lock and a Water Flow sensor too.
http://econetcontrols.com/products.php
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: BulldogLowell on March 17, 2014, 11:00:58 am
So I contacted the company this weekend as I did find 10" x 6" on their website.  They agreed to sell me the 10" model which is not in retail.

They are working on a Outside Gate Lock and a Water Flow sensor too.
http://econetcontrols.com/products.php

thanks for this, AgileHumor. 

The Gate Lock they are working on is cool.  I have been thinking about how to rig something up like that for a while.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: aaronsquire on March 17, 2014, 01:15:59 pm
Very neat. This would be great for our multi level home as upstairs gets hot in summer and cool in winter. We adjust our vents manually to try to get equal heating and cooling throughout entire home. If I programmed these to operate with temperature sensors could achieve that. They are a bit expensive but if I'm getting more consistant heating and cooling could pay for themselves... I have corner vents though. Don't see those on their website. Neat find though.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: garrettwp on March 18, 2014, 03:04:03 pm
Just ordered one earlier today. Question, does this report battery status?

- Garrett

Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: AgileHumor on March 18, 2014, 04:11:12 pm
Yes, it does report battery status :)

Manual states one year with alkaline batteries (2 x AAA) with 2 movements a day.  Manual says 2 years are possible with Lithium Ion.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: agoodman82 on March 18, 2014, 08:23:17 pm
Guys, correct me if I'm wrong but I had always heard that it's a bad idea to close off air vents in a forced air system because 1) The furnace or central AC now has to work harder to move the air which was already sized appropriately for the house it's operating in and 2) If a room's vent is closed to avoid having to heat it, the room now gets colder faster than the rest of the house and draws more hot air into that room as heat naturally flows from hot to cold areas, thus again making it inefficient to shut down a vent.

Would these vents (as cool as they are) actually be useful for climate control situations or would they just cause more potential problems than they would actually solve?
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: BulldogLowell on March 18, 2014, 08:36:04 pm
Guys, correct me if I'm wrong but I had always heard that it's a bad idea to close off air vents in a forced air system because 1) The furnace or central AC now has to work harder to move the air which was already sized appropriately for the house it's operating in and 2) If a room's vent is closed to avoid having to heat it, the room now gets colder faster than the rest of the house and draws more hot air into that room as heat naturally flows from hot to cold areas, thus again making it inefficient to shut down a vent.

Would these vents (as cool as they are) actually be useful for climate control situations or would they just cause more potential problems than they would actually solve?

many people presently (including myself) do this manually with their existing louvers; sort of fine-tuning the distribution of the hot/cool air supply.  Whilst your point is very valid, you would have to significantly restrict a lot of outlets to affect the overall operation of the HVAC system.  I think people would use this to cut off a guest bedroom they don't regularly use or a single room that just gets too warm because it has much higher airflow; a consequence of the initial engineering and installation of the system.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: NHguy on March 18, 2014, 08:52:02 pm
These looks really cool. I have a finished basement and the only heat I have down there is 2 registers cut directly into one of my main ducts from the 1st floor heating zone. The registers are usually manually turned off, unless someone is planning to hang out in the basement. It never gets toasty down there, but good enough for the kids to play/watch movies (low to mid 60's dead winter when it's a high in the teens outside)

These vents seems perfect, can set these off a scene taking into account motion/temp/light switches, tie them in to kick the 1st floor thermostat if needed, etc. I'm looking at 4x12's and it wouldn't be simple to make them larger (a few inches of additional duct work extending from the main duct to make it go through the drop ceiling)

Question for anyone that has one in their possession: From what I've seen online, it looks like you loose a good 30% of the surface area that the air flows through the vents due to the controller that opens/closes the vent. This is the only reason I'm not pulling the trigger on 2 right now. Any comments on what you think of the airflow (compared to the ones that were replaced)?

Thanks!
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: lemrock on May 27, 2014, 03:53:01 pm
I've found another wireless control air vent. Now, it's not Z Wave but it is rather cool (pun not intended) and the price is very cheap. It's called the Activent http://www.theactivent.com/ . It comes in two parts; the wireless vent and a controller. The vent and controller talk to each other and the controller acts like a wireless thermometer. You set the temperature you want the room to be at in the controller and the vent will then open or close to reach the desired temp. (This does not control your thermostat). You can have many temperature zones acting independently without a central controller and the added benefit on having individual remote control of each vent in your home.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: Pseudomizer on May 27, 2014, 04:27:53 pm
I've found another wireless control air vent. Now, it's not Z Wave but it is rather cool (pun not intended) and the price is very cheap. It's called the Activent http://www.theactivent.com/ . It comes in two parts; the wireless vent and a controller. The vent and controller talk to each other and the controller acts like a wireless thermometer. You set the temperature you want the room to be at in the controller and the vent will then open or close to reach the desired temp. (This does not control your thermostat). You can have many temperature zones acting independently without a central controller and the added benefit on having individual remote control of each vent in your home.

Looks interesting but they claim to be on smarthome.com and they are not. They are on the market since 2009 but I don't see any wide adoption and on the hvacsystems website the base model is out of stock.

The idea sounds great but honestly I am concerned because the thermostat will only kick in when it is too cold or too hot. If the room with the thermostat has the proper temperature it won't start cooling or heating so closing off vents or opening other vents won't do you any good. Maybe it is just me not getting it but this product sounds great but I don't think it is there yet. Open for corrections or suggestions ;-)
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: lemrock on May 27, 2014, 06:01:21 pm
This device obviously has to operate within the cycle and temp limits of the main thermostat. But if you have a room that tends to cool off or heat up faster than the room with the thermostat, then these activents would open and close to a temp you set within the thermostat temp limits. I agree there is very limited utility for this but interesting none the less.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: dzmiller on May 27, 2014, 08:42:51 pm
In some cases a duct booster on zwave on the power might provide more control. Furnace fan control from zwave is another way to even out temp, especially in a too warm room that has direct sun.
Direct sun can be determined by the weather app.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: integlikewhoa on May 27, 2014, 09:19:22 pm
I'm reading threw this thread and seeing everyone jumping up and down and wagging their tails like never heard or seen a zoned a/c setup before. 

https://www.forwardthinking.honeywell.com/products/zoning/zoning_products.html

I self installed my Honeywell 4 zone system 7 years ago and within the last year changed out my thermostats to Trane Z-wave's to incorporate it into VERA.

To answer some questions. In a zoning system you used a "Pressure Relief Damper" that connects the discharge air to the return/intake air with an adjustable weighted manual vent. So as pressure builds up from zones closed it dumps the air back into the return duct and recycles it threw the blower again (making the cold air even colder and hot air even hotter).

On top of this zoning systems use a discharge air temp sensor on the outlet of the blower to make sure this recycled air after passing threw a few times is not getting to cold or to hot from several passes which could lead to problems.

Sure if your only closing off 1-2 small rooms your probley not going to have a problem, but there is alot of work going into sizing your a/c and duct work. Closing some off might not cause harm but will throw it out of wack a bit.

I'm sure you could PLEG it but there is normally a controller that passes the info from several thermostats to system. It allows multiple zones to fire up the unit, and hand off between each zone without the compressor having to shut down and cycle back up. It also processes the info on how long it takes to heat or cool and zone and sets a priority. 
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: Dignan17 on June 20, 2014, 03:17:59 pm
Quote
I'm reading threw this thread and seeing everyone jumping up and down and wagging their tails like never heard or seen a zoned a/c setup before. 

https://www.forwardthinking.honeywell.com/products/zoning/zoning_products.html

I self installed my Honeywell 4 zone system 7 years ago and within the last year changed out my thermostats to Trane Z-wave's to incorporate it into VERA.
Good for you. I've heard of zoned systems, but they're pretty expensive and often extremely difficult to install. I, for one, don't have access to almost any of the ducts in my home, as they all disappear after leaving my furnace.

I'm not saying that these Econet are a good solution, though. In fact, they're some of the most marked-up products I've seen in the ZWave world, and that's saying something! I offer, as exhibit A, the Vent-Miser (http://goo.gl/Lemaic). Look closely. It's obvious that this is the exact same product as the EcoNet vent product, just with a control module that's been gutted and fitted for ZWave control. I'm not saying that isn't worth something, but I don't think it's worth a more than 1000% markup. That's kind of sick.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: Pseudomizer on June 20, 2014, 03:20:52 pm
Wow. That's way above somebody should charge. Thanks for sharing.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: Dignan17 on June 20, 2014, 03:26:11 pm
Wow. That's way above somebody should charge. Thanks for sharing.
No problem! I came across that Vent-Miser first, and then was curious to see if anyone had made a similar ZWave product. Imagine my surprise when I saw the same product for ten times the cost!

And please, everybody, if I'm wrong and this Econet product is a different thing, I'd be happy to be corrected! But you can even see the part where Econet took out the LCD screen, presumably to make room for the ZWave internals.

After searching the forums, it looks like someone else drew the same conclusion back in December (http://forum.micasaverde.com/index.php/topic,1337.msg140204.html#msg140204).
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: ServiceXp on June 20, 2014, 06:29:56 pm
integlikewhoa gave a good overview of what a true zoning system looks like.  HVAC/R is what I do too allow me to buy all these expensive zwave toys so I'll just add a few points...  :P

1) I think in principle it's an innovative idea and I can certainly see a few advantages. Maybe for that troubled room where it's too cold in the summer and just right in the winter.

There are a lot of details to actually zoning a system, that maintains comfort, and performance without jeopardizing the integrity of the equipment. So here is a "rule of thumb" that sometimes works and sometimes not.... Never ever restrict more then 1/8 of the total number of vents in a house (count every single vent), and never restrict them more that 2/3.

A quick way to make sure your system is not being harmed is to record the temperature delta across the heat exchanger (evaporator and or furnace heat exchanger) both in full load cooling and heating. The cooling delta should never exceed 24F. The furnace is a little trickier. You need to find the allowable heat rise for your furnace, typically indicated on the nomenclature plate. You should have 2 numbers, a low and high temp. Your delta during a full demand heating cycle needs to be somewhere in between those numbers.

Now about that return air bypass.. The bypass should be as long as possible, the longer the bypass line the better. This allows the excess cold and hot air to cool or heat up before getting dumped back into the return system, this is very important.  Also, while barometric dampers are "OK", if you want MUCH better regulation, a Honeywell SPC Static Pressure Control  (http://www.amazon.com/Honeywell-Static-Pressure-Control-SPC/dp/B008HQ4U9G)with motorized bypass damper is preferred..

Anyway Hope this help a little..
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: Dignan17 on June 20, 2014, 06:46:09 pm
Thanks, that was useful information about zoning. I really do like the idea, but I'm afraid it isn't possible for many people due to how their furnaces are placed. Not everyone is able to trace all the trunks of their system, unfortunately. The best I would be able to do is to zone off the top floor but accessing where that trunk hits the attic. But then I don't have a way to get the communication lines back to the basement, and while it's nice to be able to shut off the heat to the top floor in the winter, what I really want is to be able to cool the top floor more than the others in the summer.

How easy is it to retrofit these systems? I have an HVAC company coming out next week to tell me how much they'd charge, which I'm sure will be astronomical...
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: dzmiller on July 31, 2014, 11:01:20 am

Good for you. I've heard of zoned systems, but they're pretty expensive and often extremely difficult to install. I, for one, don't have access to almost any of the ducts in my home, as they all disappear after leaving my furnace.


Which is why bigger new homes and major remodels use multiple HVAC units. There should be no surprises with multiple units, especially with the A/C coil  up high in multi story homes.

There are very few homes that would have a problem closing off a duct or two, either manually or with zwave. It is an added incentive to keep the filter clean, however. Perhaps not use the now common more restrictive filters too. The old style filters allow more airflow, especially when dirty. The new style filters create a lot more service calls, especially with AC. Nothing necessarily wrong with the newer filters, they just reduce the margin of error.

And besides, a proper response to dust for a HAS owner is not a restrictive furnace filter, but a robotic vacuum. :)

I think I said this earlier: Using vera to run the furnace fan will often even out temps. Currently I'm running my second floor furnace fan at 5:30 am because the east facing bedrooms get warm with the early sunrise. Running the furnace fan also evens out rooms that warm up with electronics or cooking. Making a vera scene with a timer makes sure the fan goes off without intervention.

The furnace fan solution is often unsatisfactory once a household member is hot or cold. But as a preemptive solution it often works well. It works least well with cold rooms in winter. But changing register flow usually doesn't help much either.

I've built houses with bedrooms over 3.5 car garages. In Chicago, it's best to either heat the garage (to 50f) with a separate wall mounted gas furnace, or provide electric baseboard auxiliary heat in the bedrooms over the cold space. These solutions cost the same or less than a complicated zone setup, and work 100%. Complicated HVAC setups are usually for the benefit of the company doing the work.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: Aaron on August 01, 2014, 02:05:30 pm
My issue is lack of airflow in the upper level rooms. Air handler is in the basement so the main level (middle level) gets about 2x the air flow as the top level.

I'm looking at putting in dampers in the ducts/plenum (not at closing/controlling registers) to restrict airflow to the main level and 'force' more air to flow to the top floor.

Any comments/suggestions on this endeavor?
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: BulldogLowell on August 02, 2014, 08:02:22 am
you may benefit more by adding a high static auxiliary blower.

dampening the 1st floor may not help too much
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: ServiceXp on August 02, 2014, 08:40:14 am
Anyone contemplating blocking off an entire floor worth of vents really needs to seek the advice of an HVAC professional that has experience in correcting duct system problems.

Decreasing efficiency is bad enough; destroying an 8K+ HVAC system is far worse. :-*
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: Dignan17 on August 02, 2014, 08:41:41 am
Anyone contemplating blocking off an entire floor worth of vents really needs to seek the advice of an HVAC professional that has experience in correcting duct system problems.

Decreasing efficiency is bad enough; destroying an 8K+ HVAC system is far worse. :-*
I had an HVAC person look at my system and he said it was perfectly fine for me to block off every single vent in the basement of my house. I guess it depends on the system.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: ServiceXp on August 02, 2014, 08:53:49 am
Anyone contemplating blocking off an entire floor worth of vents really needs to seek the advice of an HVAC professional that has experience in correcting duct system problems.

Decreasing efficiency is bad enough; destroying an 8K+ HVAC system is far worse. :-*
I had an HVAC person look at my system and he said it was perfectly fine for me to block off every single vent in the basement of my house. I guess it depends on the system.
How did he determine it would be fine?

Hopefully he measured the static pressure of the system with all the stated registers closed, and used a flow hood to measure the output of each of the remaing open vents to confirm the remaining total was > ~350 cfm per ton. Anything less fails to meet the requirements of a good confirmation.

And yes of course it depends on the system.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: waynehead99 on August 02, 2014, 03:52:52 pm
I am interested in this topic myself. I bought a newer house that claims to have a higher energy rating and because of this the builder was able to get away with putting in a smaller Hvac system. During the winter there is no issues but when the summer is around the upstairs lacks a lot of cooling and air flow compared to the downstairs. I have setup Vera to cycle the fan throughout the day which has helped a little but the upstairs is never really comfortable without having the AC running a lot and costing lots of money. I have had Hvac people from two different companies come and confirm that the current system is running properly and want to sell me a completely new one. I would really like to explore other options aside from that one as it's expensive and to me seems silly to replace something that still works.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: ServiceXp on August 02, 2014, 06:25:58 pm
Attic temps?
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: Aaron on August 02, 2014, 06:54:44 pm
you may benefit more by adding a high static auxiliary blower.
what is this?
dampening the 1st floor may not help too much
why?


thx for helping me understand
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: waynehead99 on August 02, 2014, 07:54:55 pm

Attic temps?

I am not sure but it is warm. The insulation is sitting roughly 20 inches of the fluffy stuff. I have considered an attic fan but not sure how effective they are.

I have started researching the zoned retro setups and depending on price this looks like the way to go and would be easy to integrate with Vera for presence on the different floors.

What kind of cost would I be looking at for equipment on 2 zones with the duct work exposed?
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: ServiceXp on August 02, 2014, 08:04:02 pm
Can you record the temps over a week at the hottest point in the day?
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: waynehead99 on August 02, 2014, 09:58:38 pm
Just tossed a sensor up there and will monitor. Currently it's reading 91 with outside temps 75. Thank you for your time.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: waynehead99 on August 06, 2014, 08:18:11 pm
Can you record the temps over a week at the hottest point in the day?

So I know it hasn't been a week, but the info I have received over the last few days is pretty consistent. Peak of the day its 115 degrees in the attic with 85 degrees outside. I have been luck to have the days pretty much be the same over the last few. One thing i did notice is that once the sun goes down and the temp outside starts to drop, the attic cools down pretty quick and gets down to about 60 degrees by the late evening. So it would appear that the passive venting is doing its job pretty well.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: ServiceXp on August 06, 2014, 09:10:26 pm
Ok,  so site unseen, those temps are ok. 

Time to contact an HVAC company that has experience in ductwork system deficiencies.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: waynehead99 on August 06, 2014, 09:12:30 pm
Yep. Had two out and they both say the system installed was undersized. House is only 4 years old and it seems they undersized it on purpose because of the Energy rating on the house. Heat is fine but AC is not. Sounds like I am gonna be replacing the whole thing. More I researched on zoned systems more t sounded like the wrong way to go.
Title: Re: Zwave air vent
Post by: ServiceXp on August 06, 2014, 09:32:44 pm
Is this a new house? If the original load calc was not performed correctly you may have some legal recourse. 

Make sure you get a copy of the load calcs the 2 companies performed.