Author Topic: Somebody please convince me to stay.  (Read 1473 times)

Offline RichardTSchaefer

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Re: Somebody please convince me to stay.
« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2017, 08:49:02 am »
I would not run on Vera (although I have not tried) because it has always been memory starved.
Vera runs  OpenWRT specifically designed for Router type devices.
Also I have a web server in the App to allow browser configuration.
This would conflict with the port 80 server on Vera that provides the UI for Vera.

I tested with a much older "Raspberry Model B" (not the 3) so it should run just fine.

Google and API.AI (the natural language processing provider used by Google) has not defined the process to support multiple languages ...
So I may need to release an agent for each language.
When that comes time I will need help for each language.
Supporting other languages for natural language programming is not the same as traditional language localization procedures.
I do not think it should be too difficult for someone that is bilingual.

Offline cb4

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Re: Somebody please convince me to stay.
« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2017, 09:31:18 pm »
Its better to understand how a device works then to be afraid of the unknown.

Absolutely!!!

Thanks for the pointer to the S2 framework info. More security is a good thing. Just take what you read with a grain of salt. History shows that statements like this:

       "S2 also completely removes the risk of devices being hacked while they are included in the network"

will be proven false over time. For now, though, z-wave is certainly the best bet for the secure smarthome.

Offline Alex Waverley

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Re: Somebody please convince me to stay.
« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2017, 05:59:41 pm »

On another note always listening does not = always transmitting. If you are worried about Google Home and Amazon Echo always listening and transmitting take one or both and set them an on a static IP address. Turn on and setup logging on your router or firewall and setup a syslogger your PC and do some testing to see what you find. Its better to understand how a device works then to be afraid of the unknown.

Not bad advice. Only by understanding exposure to risk can one make an informed decision as to their own privacy requirements. I have been involved with computer security for many years and have written and taught on the subject. I use only open source software.  I use asymmetrical encryption and physical isolation of critical data. I use VLAN's to isolate my automation and entertainment systems. I encrypt and sign outgoing emails whenever possible.  I read emails in plain text only. I don't "facetwit" or use social media, and  I don't carry a "smart" phone. Not because I am afraid of the "unknown". On the contrary, I know what can be done because I've done it (strictly for ethical purposes, of course).  Phil Zimmerman called it "good civic hygiene".