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Author Topic: Momentary wall switch?  (Read 499 times)

Offline flaquito

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Momentary wall switch?
« on: May 22, 2018, 10:31:52 am »
I just bought a few Linear SmartLED bulbs for my outdoor fixtures, and they work great. I wanted to use a ZWave switch, but my home's wiring doesn't have neutral at the switches, and this particular wiring is nearly impossible to get to in order to re-do. So, bulbs it is.

Obviously the switch now has to remain on. But I noticed that these bulbs have a way to manually control them by quickly turning the switch off and back on again (once for on, twice for off). So it seems like a switch that is normally on, but can be pressed for a momentary off would be ideal in this situation. Does anyone make anything like that? I've so far found normally-open-momentary-close, but not the opposite. (Bonus points if it's a Decorator switch).

Edit: used the opposite of the word I meant to. :P
« Last Edit: May 22, 2018, 02:43:15 pm by flaquito »

Offline cc4005

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Re: Momentary wall switch?
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2018, 11:01:21 am »
Would have to do some investigation to see if it can be done for momentary open rather than momentary closed, but here's a video on modifying a regular switch to act as momentary closed.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_QJgYJfNKRI

Offline flaquito

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Re: Momentary wall switch?
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2018, 11:47:46 am »
Interesting, thanks for the link. My only concern with something like this would be that modifying a UL listed product voids the UL listing, which would likely invalidate any insurance claim should an electrical fire happen (even if it's unrelated).

Offline flaquito

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Re: Momentary wall switch?
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2018, 02:42:42 pm »
Or, it turns out that I can just use the plastic tab that they included with the bulb to lock the switch into the on position. It's flexible enough that it's still possible to press the switch and have it turn off, but rigid enough that it turns the switch back on when it's released. I guess sometimes low-tech is best. :P